Saturday, 9 September 2017

Links (1)

**Metro Vancouver is currently updating debris flow studies on Metro lands on Grouse Mountain. Results of this study will guide decision-making on the need for future debris flow mitigation measures on the mountain. The report is expected to be completed in Winter 2013/2014.--------->>>>>
NSMBA TAmPering with drainage patterns, etc., adds to irreversible ecological damage inflicted, destabilizing our temperate rain forest slopes...There is a lot of vegetation removal, and digging of pits off-trail for dirt to pack on the ever-eroding, unsustainable mountain bike trails. The mountain bike cult is a very consumptive "sport" with both off-road riding and non-stop trail building activities. It may have to take a lawsuit to stop them. 















"Holy Moly!"
 Do you think this mountain biker even noticed that Frog? (cartoon from William Nealy's, "The Mountain Bike Way of Knowledge,1989) ...not to mention how erosive this style of riding can be on the natural environment. (plus, mtb trail building...)
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Mount Fromme East April 30, 2009
Preliminary Landslide Hazard Assessment and Risk Analysis Project No. 0404-018
BGC ENGINEERING
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**Debris Flow Hazard Studies: Winter 2013/14
"Metro Vancouver is currently studying additional measures to reduce the potential impacts on development at the base of Grouse Mountain. New protective works are expected to cost several million dollars." (page 41)
(*draft/final report not made public on DNV.org/Metro websites...?)

UPDATE May 2017:  Thames Creek Debris Flow Hazard https://www.geoweb.dnv.org/Products/Reports/PublicSafety/ThamesCreek_BGCHazardRepSections.pdf (Debris Flow Basin construction August to October 2017) Several other creeks under Public Safety concerns in Lynn Valley, ie. Hastings and Dyer Creeks; Kilmer Creek...
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"There is a critical relationship between geomorphology, surface drainage and groundwater."

"Groundwater is one of the main elements of slope stability since effective stress is controlled primarily by water. Any activity or development that affects the surface or subsurface drainage will therefore influence the effective stress and in turn slope stability." 

HASTINGS CREEK WATERSHED PLAN: Geomorphology and Ecology Assessment (2012)

Fromme Mtn. - Kilmer Creek Damage: http://youtu.be/FrNNIgJwpww  

**Links (1) continues at Links (2) post, following. Links page would not post properly in one post, here... Thank you.**



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